Friday, 30 August 2013 16:07

Cann Dentistry

Late summer and early autumn usually means weed pollens, particularly ragweed for many allergy sufferers. The fall can be just as troublesome as the spring, and with such a wet season preceding us, we can anticipate high pollen counts for prolonged periods of time. Accordingly, one would take precautions to reduce exposure to pollens such as limiting early day outdoor activities, keeping windows closed, and cleaning outdoor pets before they come into the home.

In addition to taking measures to reduce exposure to fall pollens, many people also supplement with over-the-counter anti-histamines, nasal saline or decongestants. There are also several plant-based therapies which have shown benefit:

• Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) – Commonly used for headaches, two studies confirmed its efficacy in head to head trials versus OTC antihistamines. Make sure you purchase "PA-free" formulations to avoid liver toxicity

woman-in-nature• Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) – Although evidence is lacking for its role in treating allergies, I have had several patients report dramatic improvements in rhinitis symptoms from using Nettle formulations.

• Quercetin – Provides Flavonoids, a potent anti-inflammatory, which has been demonstrated to have anti-histamine properties in test tubes. Lacking clinical evidence but testimonials from patients carry weight, given its low risk.

Lastly, consider the role of diet, emotions and stress in inflammation. Remember that the body is always trying to restore homeostasis, so try and lead a lifestyle that fosters this process.

 

Avicenna Integrative Medicine
1000 Johnson Ferry Road, Suite E200
Marietta, GA 30068

(770) 977-9300 | www.avicennamd.com

 

Maziar Rezvani, MD, FAAAAI serves as director of Avicenna Integrative Medicine and Avicenna Allergy and Asthma. He specializes in integrative medicine and allergy, asthma and immunology, and his interests include the role of inflammation in various disease states, diet and nutrition, and botanical medicine.

 

This article is brought to you by Avicenna Integrative Medicine
For information on other topics from Atlanta's experts go to www.bestselfconnect.com

Marietta Facial Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics Center is led by Seth A. Yellin, MD, FACS, formerly Chief of Facial Plastic Surgery at Emory Healthcare from 1999-2011 and a nationally recognized expert in creating a natural look when performing facial rejuvenation and rhinoplasty. The Center provides patients with a state-of-the-art aesthetic experience in a freestanding, beautiful, modern facility designed with your needs in mind.

Whether you are seeking advice on how to best care for your skin or perhaps you have a concerning mole or skin condition requiring special attention our Dermatologist partners at Marietta Dermatology are on-site and ready to help. Additionally, our in-house medical aestheticians and laser experts can educate you and determine the best and most economical care plan to address your skin concerns.

Our aesthetics center, which is staffed by highly trained and knowledgeable skin care experts, is the ideal place to experience non-invasive treatments for your facial blemishes, unwanted skin redness or brown spots, facial lines and wrinkles and or loss of collagen in the face and neck. These issues can be addressed with therapies ranging from topical medications and cosmeceuticals to chemical peels, intense pulsed light, vibradermabrasion, laser facials and other laser procedures designed to provide maximum benefit with minimum downtime. Unwanted body hair can also be addressed with laser hair removal. Ultherapy, which uses high intensity ultrasound energy to contract and tighten relaxed skin of the face and neck, is an exciting new technique that really expands what can be done to improve ones appearance with no downtime. Lastly, cellulite is effectively treated with SmoothShapes technology, which not only smoothes the skin but also helps reduce inches in the treated areas.

marietta-facialIf facial aging or simply looking tired, in spite of getting a good nights rest, is an issue or perhaps there is a facial feature that you have never been comfortable with, a personalized consultation with Dr. Yellin will be comprehensive and informative and is an ideal forum for getting all of your questions answered. Dr. Yellin will complete his assessment by providing you with a written summary of his customized plan, which may range from home skin care products to in office minimally invasive injectable treatments or if necessary, surgical procedures. If surgery is recommended, procedures can often be performed in our office operatory under local anesthesia or if general anesthesia is required, at a certified outpatient surgical facility, which is the ideal location for aesthetic surgical procedures as it provides the same level of safety and patient care as a modern hospital in a friendly, patient-oriented environment.

Lastly, our practice provides a truly integrated care approach to the management of skin cancer. Whether you need a full body skin check, a biopsy to diagnose a suspicious skin lesion, specialized Mohs skin cancer removal, pathologic expertise or extensive facial reconstruction, our practice provides all of these services and more and has been serving Marietta and all of North Georgia for more than 40 years. Come visit with us and see how we may serve you.

 

Seth A. Yellin, MD,FACS
Facial Plastic Surgeon

Marietta Facial Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Center
111 Marble Mill Road NW
Marietta, GA 30060
770-425-7575

www.mariettafacialplastics.com

 

This article is brought to you by Marietta Facial Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics Center
For information on other topics from Atlanta's experts go to www.bestselfconnect.com

Thursday, 29 August 2013 17:02

Tips for Healthy Aging

Why is it so important to age healthy?

The world population is aging rapidly and life expectancy is increasing but not necessarily quality of life. There are many factors in one's control that can help them age healthy so that life can be enjoyable at any age.

Does nutrition play a role in aging healthy?

Good nutrition can help prevent age-related diseases and improve overall well-being. It is important to eat real food that is not full of chemicals, preservatives, or refined sugars, and to eat organic when possible. Here are 10 super foods to help you age healthy.

• Berries. Rich in antioxidants.

• Leafy Greens. Support bone, cognitive, and heart health.

• Tomatoes. Lycopene is great for heart, eye, and skin health. Also has anti-cancer benefits.

• Nuts. Almonds and walnuts support heart and brain function.

• Red Grapes. Resveratrol, an antioxidant in red grapes, is anti-inflammatory and supports heart health. Animal studies have shown resveratrol to actually extend lifespan.

• Fish. Omega-3 fatty acids keep the heart and brain healthy.

• Legumes. Nutrient dense, high in fiber, and heart healthy.

• Herbs and Spices. Turmeric and ginger contain anti-inflammatory compounds that might reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

• Cruciferous vegetables. Anti-cancer properties.

• Vitamin D rich foods- Supports bone and immune health. Also possesses anti-cancer properties.

older-couple-on-bicycleWhat lifestyle habits can affect the way we age?

Three lifestyle habits that can greatly impact how well one ages are: sleep, stress, and exercise. Sleep plays a critical role in immune function, memory, metabolism, and cardiovascular health. Excess stress can lead to impaired immunity, increased risk of heart disease, and diminished hormone production. Exercise lowers risk of heart disease, boosts energy, and promotes enhanced mental function and mood.

In addition to the standard recommended tests and screenings, what other testing can be done to promote healthy aging?

There are many additional tests that can help promote healthy aging and disease prevention. Here are a few examples.

• Estrogen Metabolism. Assesses how a woman metabolizes her estrogen. Estrogen can either be broken down in to protective or aggressive metabolites.If a defect is found there are natural ways to correct this.

• Micronutrient. Comprehensive measurement of nutrient levels.

• Food Intolerance. Determines what foods the body has an intolerance to and what foods are acceptable.

• Lipoprotein Particle Testing. Advanced cholesterol profile that measures cholesterol particle size and cardiac markers of inflammation.

• Telomere. Measures telomere length in relation to one's age and can tell you one's age within.

 

Allison Cochran PA-C, MPAS
Natural Health Atlanta

Phone: 678-892-6865
www.naturalhealthatlanta.com

Most Major Insurance Plans Accepted

 

Allison Cochran is a Physician Assistant specializing in Anti-Aging/Preventive Medicine, Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy, and nutritional analysis. She is Board Certified in Anti-Aging Medicine by the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and has a Master's Degree in Physician Assistant Studies.

 

This article is brought to you by Natural Health Atlanta
For information on other topics from Atlanta's experts go to www.bestselfconnect.com

 

Thursday, 29 August 2013 16:38

Focus on diabetes — managing your levels

More than a quarter of Americans over age 65 have diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) states most have Type 2 diabetes, which has a strong pre-determination linked to family history but can also be affected by lifestyle choices. Type 2 diabetes can be controlled, but if it's not, it can cause serious, even fatal, damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and teeth.

Everyone over age 40 should have a blood test screening for diabetes at least every 3 years, and those with risk factors should have it every year. The number one risk factor is being overweight. For both the treatment, and prevention, of diabetes:

Watch your diet carefully: By eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts, you can keep your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. A dietician, or books such as the ADA's 101 Nutrition Tips for People with Diabetes, can help. If you consume alcohol, limit your intake to two drinks per day for men and one for women.

Lose weight: The ADA stresses that losing even a small amount of weight can help reduce your risk of complications from diabetes. A dietician can help you find ways to eat the foods you like while reducing your intake of calories.

diabetesIncrease physical activity: A personal health coach can help you become more active. And it doesn't mean that you have to go to the gym; it can mean walking around your house or working in your yard. Exercise helps improve your strength, flexibility, and endurance. Try to get in 30 minutes of sustained exercise 5 times a week. Please speak with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Sleep well and reduce stress: Getting the appropriate amount of rest and managing your stress will improve diabetes control.

Monitor your blood sugar and take your prescribed medications: By keeping track of your blood sugar, you can achieve better control of your diabetes. Always take your insulin or oral diabetes pills as prescribed by your doctor.

 

Dr. Robinson and Dr. Rekaby
Concentra Primary Care

Edgewood
1220 Caroline Street
Atlanta, GA 30307

Sandy Springs Primary Care
6334 Roswell Road NE Suite B.
Sandy Springs, GA 30328

www.ConcentraUrgentCare.com/Atlanta


Concentra Primary Care offers a comprehensive approach to health care that begins with a family doctor and care coordinator who work together to care for patients' full health, and coordinate any additional care needed from other supporting providers.  By creating an ongoing relationship with patients, Concentra providers help to manage chronic and costly health care conditions, including care for seniors.  With flexible scheduling, longer appointment times, and experienced providers, Concentra Primary Care connects the dots that form a larger picture of health. It's health care with a focus on getting well and living well today, and in the years ahead.

 

This article is brought to you by Concentra Primary Care
For information on other topics from Atlanta's experts go to www.bestselfconnect.com

Known by many as "The Bra Whisperer," Susan Nethero has helped countless women find the bra of their dreams and changed the way they feel about themselves. Giving women a positive body image is something she is passionate about.

Whether she was doing a bra fitting at Intimacy, the store she founded in 1992, or fitting Oprah Winfrey herself, it is all about uplifting the spirit. She remembers, "At Intimacy, we were able to take our expertise and share it every day to uplift women and give them a whole new confidence about their beauty, their bodies and their lives!" Nethero's newest venture, REVEAL Total Transformation, with a two-time Emmy-nominated executive producer, centers on improving women's self-esteem, body image, and confidence. "My life's purpose is to uplift and support women in their professional and personal lives," she says.

 

Best advice you ever received?
Find something you are passionate about and don't let others discourage you from pursuing your dreams. You may not be able to have it all, but you can surely get a whole lot of what you want by loving what you do every day! So live large!

Best achievement?
Being on The Oprah Show five times and really exploding women's interests in bras and how they make a difference in a woman's shape, beauty and confidence! It still blows my mind to see the transformations of women at Intimacy bra fit boutiques.

Best thing about owning your own business?
Creating a culture of fulfillment for each employee and serving the needs of customers before your own.

Best new project?
I am actively working on women's self-esteem issues through the new REVEAL Total Transformation seminars to help women improve their self-perception, body image and confidence. I am working with an esteemed reality TV executive producer of over 100 style and makeover shows, Riaz Patel, whose experience is unparalleled. We will offer innovative perception and psychological techniques to help women let go of years of defeating behaviors and see themselves in a new light. The next Reveal workshop will be September 28-29 and October 19- 20. There is more information on the website www.revealworkshop.com.

Best bra you've ever owned?
Marie Jo bras from Intimacy because they are beautiful and fit me perfectly.

Best guilty pleasure?
I love shopping for new clothes and feeling special in new fashions!

Best surefire mood booster?
A good glass of wine to share in my husband's company.

Best place for "me" time?
The spa or the pool.

Best book you've read recently?
"Dreaming in Chinese," as I just got back from a trip to China to visit my youngest daughter, who is a Fulbright Scholar working on empowerment of women in the political process. It has given me great insight into my daughter's life in China.

Who are the people who help you to be your best self?
I have business associate friends from the corporate and entrepreneurial world that I often call upon for advice, and as a member of C200 and Golden Seeds, I have amazing women with whom to network. My husband and I attend several conferences throughout the year with Dr. George Pratt. We have a personal trainer, Mary Elizabeth Hogenmueller, who is a great motivator for health, wellness and yoga.

 

 

If you're like most people, you're probably clear about the fact that healthcare laws are changing. Unfortunately, that might be all you're clear about. Don't worry – most people are in the same boat because the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its implications are complicated and multifaceted. Read on to get answers to some of your questions from Atlanta experts about how healthcare reforms may affect you, your family and your business.


What's happened so far?

The ACA was signed into law in March of 2010. Since then, parts of the law have rolled out in stages every few months. Tina Weiss, the senior director of Individual and Family Plans for Kaiser Permanente of Georgia, breaks down the most important changes that the law has required all insurers to implement. She says, "Number one, preventive care coverage became available on every plan for no cost. So you can go in and get your preventive screenings for free now." As of September 2010, the new law also prevents insurers from charging a copay if you go to your doctor for a well visit. She continues, "The second significant change also came in 2010 when we started allowing children on plans whether or not they had pre-existing conditions. And another important change was that we now allow children to stay on their parents' plan up until age 26, and that kept a lot of people covered." These pieces of the ACA are already in effect.

 

What's coming up next?

The next significant date to be aware of is October 1, 2013. Lisa Owen of Core Benefits Solutions explains that on this date, open enrollment begins and continues through December. On January 1, 2014, "Every U.S. citizen is required to have health insurance, period. If you don't, you will pay a penalty tax when you file your taxes." The penalty is minimal the first year, just $95 or 1 percent of your income (which ever is higher), but it will increase for the next two years. According to Owens, the penalty cap is a maximum of $2,085 per family. Owen also points out that beginning in 2015, businesses with 50 or more employees will also have to pay a penalty if they do not offer "affordable" coverage, which is defined by the government as coverage that costs less than 9.5 percent of annual household income.

According to Michael Parker, CFP and senior consultant at Thrive Advisory Group, LLC, "The law has two possible penalties attributed to 'large' businesses. First, if no health plan is offered there is a $2,000 penalty for every employee minus the first 30 employees if just one employee goes to the exchange and gets a subsidy. Second, if an employer offers a plan, but it does not meet the 60 percent actuarial value or does not meet the 9.5 percent affordability then an employer will pay a $3,000 penalty for each employee that goes to the exchange and gets a subsidy."

Eric Haglund, president of Georgia Benefits, emphasizes another upcoming change. Insurance is now "guaranteed issue," meaning coverage cannot be denied based on pre-existing conditions. He explains, "So if you're uninsured and have a heart condition, on October 1, you'll be able to apply for insurance. They'll have to cover you, and they'll have to cover your heart." The coverage, however, will not start until January 1, 2014. To enable everyone to educate themselves and select an appropriate plan, the Health Insurance Marketplace opens on October 1 as well. Sometimes referred to as the healthcare "exchange," the Marketplace is a federal website where individuals can go to shop for health insurance. Some states have their own state websites to go through, but Georgia does not, so Georgia residents can use the federal site.

 

What can the Marketplace offer my family and me?

The main thing the Marketplace offers is government subsidies for lower-income individuals and families. "Lower-income" is defined as an annual income of less than 400 percent of the poverty level – for an individual, Owen says, that works out to about $45,000. Weiss points out that the number of dependents will raise this threshold. For example, 400 percent of the poverty level for a family of four is about $95,000. If you or your family fall within this 400 percent category and do not have access to affordable healthcare through an employer, you should be eligible for a government subsidy through the Marketplace to help with the cost of your premium. Weiss explains that the subsidies are "financial assistance, basically. And so those that have not been able to afford it before, now have opportunities to afford it."

 

What about my business?

If you run a small business (fewer than 50 employees) and are below a certain threshold, your business too may be eligible for a subsidy through the online Small Business Health Options Program, known as SHOP. The smallest businesses, Owen says, with fewer than 25 employees who make less than $50,000 annually, may also be eligible for a small tax credit through the SHOP. Owen posits that the price offerings for businesses through the SHOP may not be very different from those found elsewhere, so she says the Marketplace and its subsidy offerings will likely be most utilized by individuals. "All businesses, including small businesses, need to be aware of the compliance/administrative impact. I refer to this as the "soft cost" associated with the law. The man-hours, systems, reporting, etc. that it will take to maintain compliance will be an added burden to all businesses (i.e. the mandatory DOL notice all businesses have to distribute to all employees no later than October 1, 2013)."

 

Let's talk money. Will I pay more?

Maybe. Part of the ACA is something called "community rating," according to Owen, Haglund, and Weiss. Weiss explains that the "community" this phrase refers to is a geographic community. "For instance, Metro Atlanta is 'Rating Area #3,'" she says. Insurance companies now look at your geographical area and your age to determine your rate. "Tobacco status is also taken into account," Parker says. This is different than in the past, when your personal medical experience determined your rate. "So that could mean an increase in cost for some people and a decrease in cost for other people," says Weiss.

Something else to consider is a new three-to-one ratio in place for insurance companies: The price of their lowest-cost person cannot be more than three times the cost of their highest-cost person. Now, an example in plain English: If a 20-year-old is paying $100, a 60-year-old can only be charged three times that amount, or $300. Before the reform, that disparity was as high as a ratio of six to one. Basically, this means that in the past, young healthy people started out with low premiums that could – and would – climb throughout their lives. With the new ratio in place, you can expect less fluctuation across your lifetime. Weiss illustrates it plainly, saying, "Imagine that as a big slope. As you bring the slope more toward even, you're going to see some rates increase for younger folks and some rates decrease for older folks."

Haglund explains, "If community rating for individuals and groups under 50 means that rates are basically averaged, then in theory 50 percent of Americans should pay more and 50 percent will pay less. However, because of required changes in coverage and new taxes, if I had to guess, then more likely 75 percent will pay a higher premium and 25 percent will pay less. Groups with more than 50 employees also have new taxes in January so rates should increase on those group plans." This is all an educated guess as specific rates have not been released. Parker also notes, "With such a restrictive three to one band you may see a shift in the whole price continuum towards a more expensive cost. I would be very surprised if 25 percent or more saw a price decrease."

But before you younger readers worry too much about your rates possibly increasing, remember that the subsidy kicks in if you make anything up to about $45,000 per year. If you make more than that but still don't feel you can afford your healthcare premiums, Weiss says the government has created a catastrophic plan, which is a lower-cost plan geared toward people under 30. Haglund expresses some concerns that this younger age bracket still might struggle to afford their premiums when the community rating kicks in, but Weiss says, "I think there are enough options, and quite honestly, so many people fall under the subsidy amount."

So, how does the law's implementation vary from state to state and what does that mean to Georgia residents? "Each state is making a number of decisions about implementation that will change the experience for consumers in small ways. For instance, in some states (i.e. CA and OR), they are mandating health plan designs," says Weiss. This means that all carriers will offer the same plan and the difference will be in the choice of doctors, quality and price.  Some are mandating rules about how brokers can sell on the Marketplace (MD, CO). There are many more differences as well. What this means is that consumers may have a slightly different shopping experience in other states, but in general all states have essential health benefits, access to premium subsidies through the Marketplace and standard pricing rules across carriers. Georgians may not see a Marketplace or plans that are tailored directly for the unique aspects of Georgia, but they will still receive all the same benefits that other states will have.

 

What if I don't want or need to use the Marketplace?

Good news: You don't have to! The Marketplace is merely a tool for customers who want to take advantage of the federal subsidies. Weiss points out, "You can still do any of your normal shopping methods that you use today: going directly to carrier sites, using the broker, etc." If you don't need to shop around because you're insured through work and satisfied with your coverage, then as long as your company keeps the same plan, it's unlikely that much will change. Even your doctor will probably stay the same, since most employers are not changing their networks of care providers. The only real difference, Weiss says, is "people are getting more coverage than before, and that means your costs are more. But it's that tradeoff," she says – higher costs, but better care. She points out that the "lean plans" of years past with high deductibles and little coverage would certainly be cheaper, but thanks to the law's requirements about "essential health benefits," insurers are required to provide more coverage than before. "It varies how much that is going to increase costs for folks," says Weiss. "We have a lot of people that will actually see their prices drop."

So, while the exact changes in rates remains to be seen, the bottom line is that there are lots of options out there and you, the consumer, are more empowered than ever to find the coverage you need. Whether you utilize subsidies through the Marketplace for yourself, through SHOP for your business, or whether you stick with an employer's plan, know that it's up to you to seek out the right plan. Above all, make sure you use your available tools and resources to find coverage that works for you and is effective by January 1, 2014.

If you have further questions, post them on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/bestselfatlanta). We'll ask our experts to answer them in "The 'New' Healthcare: Part II," coming in October, which will delve deeper into this complicated topic.

Editor's Note: While every effort was made to ensure the information provided in this article was accurate up until press day, due to implementation changes that are continuing to be made, we cannot guarantee the information has not changed in some way.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Click on the link below to Watch
The
"New" Healthcare Panel Discussion Event that was held on September 25, 2013.

http://youtu.be/gL0ZM5mO-Ic

NewHealthcarePANEL

 

Editorial resources
Eric Haglund, Georgia Benefits – www.georgiabenefits.com
Michael Parker, Thrive Advisory Group, LLC – (404) 216-1108
Lisa Owen, Core Benefit Solutions – www.corebenefitsga.com
Tina Weiss, Kaiser Permanente of Georgia – www.kaiserpermanente.org


Thursday, 29 August 2013 14:59

The Chelko Foundation Makes a Difference

Body painting. Is it different? Yes. Is it sexy? Sure. Is it about more than that? Absolutely. Over the last few years, The Chelko Foundation has brought body painting events to Atlanta and paired this unique art form with their ultimate mission of ending gender bias.

It all began with the man himself, Atlanta artist Paul Chelko. After watching his dear wife Debbie suffer through breast cancer, he was angry at how women were treated in the medical system and in the world. His frustration spurred him toward great things: He started The Chelko Foundation with the lofty, overarching goal of ending gender discrimination and violence toward women. Chelko was an artist, so the foundation tapped into various forms of the arts to further their mission.

Randi Layne, the executive director of The Chelko Foundation, met Chelko in the early '80s when he was painting jeans in the window of Tootsies in Atlanta. Already he appreciated an unconventional canvas for art, and Layne remembers that he had "paint buckets everywhere, just painting clothing—jeans, jean jackets, shirts, everything." She was drawn to his dynamic, engaging personality, and they soon became close friends.

In 2007, when Chelko passed away from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Layne took over his foundation. She was a natural choice thanks to her close relationship with Chelko and the fact that, she says, "Women's issues really speak to me." At first she was a little afraid to tackle such a big goal. She was encouraged, though, when she realized, "[Running the foundation] did for me what we want to do for other women. What it did was empower me." With that knowledge and personal success already under her belt, she forged ahead with Chelko's mission to empower other people through artistic media.

482Cue the body painting scene: In 2010, The Chelko Foundation hosted the first Bodies as a Work of Art competition as a fundraiser. According to the guidelines of the World Bodypainting Association, artists from all over the world have six and a half hours to paint a nearly nude model, who will then walk a catwalk or do a short performance to show off the artwork. The artists arrive having planned out their designs ahead of time, and the models arrive prepared to be transformed.

Now, don't balk at the word "model," thinking that word isn't typically associated with female empowerment. Layne points out, "The bodies that you see on the runway at Bodies as a Work of Art are not all whatever 'perfect' is." Instead, the show is comprised of women and men of many shapes and sizes. And the best part is that once they are painted, their bodies are essentially irrelevant: The art becomes the real focus, and the personal empowerment follows closely behind. "It really does transform a person." Instead of seeing any so-called "issues" with their bodies, "It's just this beautiful image that [the models] see, and they walk away from it a changed person. It's very cool."

Under the direction of Development Director Ken Goldwasser, the Chelko Foundation's work doesn't stop after the show, either. Over the years, they've given significant monetary support to groups and initiatives dedicated to women's issues, like Jaden's Ladder, Susan G. Komen, Women at Risk International, and Eve Ensler's worldwide activist movement V-Day. They also have scholarships and grants that support the arts, which in the past have gone to SCAD or directly to artists themselves.

The fourth annual Bodies as a Work of Art event on September 28 will be a live exhibition of professional body art, along with music and other entertainment. This year, for the first time in this event's history, the artists have been given a theme to depict: "Empowerment." The entire event also raises money for the Chelko Foundation Scholarship of the Arts, Chelko's endowed scholarship at SCAD, and Angel Flight. You can enjoy the night even more in the knowledge that you have given back while enjoying one of Atlanta's most unique and inspirational events.

 

Bodies as a Work of Art/Living Art America - September 28, 2013

(404) 993-9030 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | www.thechelkofoundation.org | www.livingartamerica.com

September 28th, 2013 at 7:00PM until Midnight At the Atlantic Aviation Hangars: 2040 Airport Road, Atlanta, GA 30341

Tickets — $150.00 donation to the Chelko Foundation ($175 at the door) You must be 21+ to attend.

Childhood obesity rates have been climbing for the past 30 years, and by 2010, more than one-third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control. Because of this rise in obesity rates, many experts are predicting that this may be the first generation of children that will not live as long as their parents.

In the national ranking by state, Georgia has held the dishonor of coming in second only to Arkansas in rates of childhood obesity. In fact, childhood obesity has become so prevalent that it has been referred to as an epidemic.

The good news is that childhood obesity is also preventable. In order to call attention to this important issue, September has been named Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. Schools, organizations and individuals are asked to support the awareness effort with education, activities and distribution of information. The verdict is that from school lunches to snack machines and from family dinners to video games, childhood obesity does not have a sole culprit. This means that attacking the epidemic from all directions offers the best plan of action to elicit real change.

"We've probably seen some improvement or at least stabilization," says Dr. Stephanie Walsh, medical director of child wellness for Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. This does not mean that Georgia has reached the finish line, but it does mean that childhood obesity is a problem that can be solved. "It should be encouraging. If we all work together, we can change the way we've been living."

school-caffeteria

 

The Role of Schools

For many children, a great deal of eating, exercising and nutrition education takes place at school. Beginning with cafeteria lunches, schools have been making strides to offer healthier options that fall within the ever-changing guidelines of the USDA. "The USDA lunch regulations changed in school year 2012-2013 and included a New Meal Pattern," says Shani Hall MS, RD, LD, food and nutrition area supervisor with Cobb County School District. "These new regulations included calorie ranges for each school level that are in line with the 2010 'Dietary Guidelines for Americans,' mandating daily fruit and vegetable offerings (including an assortment of dark green, red-orange, legumes and starchy vegetables), offering more whole grains and phasing in sodium limits."

The USDA requirements are minimums, and school districts may provide more healthy choices. For example, according to Malcolm Quillen, school nutrition manager for DeKalb County, in addition to incorporating more fresh fruits and vegetables, schools offer only low-fat and fat-free milk. And while the federal government requires the inclusion of five daily components – protein, vegetable, fruit, grain and milk – schools may offer even more. In order to remain within the calorie requirements for each student, desserts have become rare, and even potentially questionable items have received a makeover. "While you may see bread or you may see pizza, most of these items are made with whole grain," says Quillen. However, even while schools work to offer healthier choices, school nutritionists and chefs often find that the students' palates could use a makeover as well.

Lower sodium limits will be required by the 2014-2015 school year, and these could also prove to be a trial for picky eaters. "This year our focus is testing and implementing recipes with more herbs and spices and fresh ingredients. Healthy food isn't nutritious until it's eaten, so we've always involved students in our menu planning process," says Brittany Slotten, MS, RD, LD, food and nutrition area supervisor with Cobb County School District. "We constantly collect feedback about our menus and test new products and recipes with students." Working with and educating students has earned the Cobb County School District awards from the USDA for creating healthier school environments through promotion of good nutrition and physical activity. The district served more than 80,000 pounds of Georgia Grown produce in school cafeterias during the 2012-2013 school year.

 

farmers-marketThe Role of Local Health Organizations

Including local produce in school lunches is a great way meals can be healthier and provide opportunities for education. Georgia Organics started the first Farm to School program six years ago and has witnessed exponential growth. During the 2011-2012 school year, 14 school districts across the state purchased local produce for a total of three million meals. For 2012-2013, that number rose to 40 school districts, and Georgia Organics expects to have far exceeded its goal of five million meals that include locally grown foods.

Farm to School programs are multifaceted. They introduce farmers to school nutrition directors so that local fruits and vegetables can make their way into cafeterias, and they educate through gardening, in-class activities and taste testing of new produce in cafeterias. "Kids just don't have experiences eating fresh fruits and vegetables," says Emily Rose, Farm to School assistant with Georgia Organics. "Studies show that Farm to School programs increase fruit and vegetable consumption among children. Teaching kids about food helps them want to try new food."

Although they do a lot of good, Farm to School programs sometimes come with implementation challenges. For a large school district like DeKalb County, the trick is finding enough local product to supply the entire district with the same thing. Many small farmers simply do not produce enough. To solve this problem, Rose has seen districts split menus so that half of the district gets the item one week, and the other half gets it the next week. In another situation, groups of local farmers pooled their kale to have enough to cover an entire large school district.

This October, Georgia Organics sponsors the Lettuce Try It campaign to encourage schools to serve local Georgia lettuce – something the state produces plenty of, but mostly exports.

For some older students, vending machines offer a third option to school lunches and a packed lunch from home, and unfortunately these machines are outside the purview of the county nutritionists. Moreover, the machines do not currently have USDA requirements to meet, but this might be changing. "The USDA recently proposed a Competitive Foods Policy that would ensure that only healthy options be sold in vending machines in schools. If this policy is adopted, then changes could occur as early as 2015," Hall says.

family-eating-healthy

 

The Role of Parents

Even with the improvements to school lunches, some parents and students still decide to brown bag it. "We tend to pack our kids' lunches a lot," says Michelle Bowers, parent of daughters ages 7 and 9 and chair of the Health & Wellness Committee at Atlanta Neighborhood Charter School. "My younger daughter has severe food allergies, so it's a necessity for her." With her older daughter, Bowers uses the school lunch menu as an opportunity to discuss food choices and allows her to choose a couple of school meals a week and take lunch from home on other days. "When she comes home, we talk about what she ate and what she didn't eat."

While children spend most of their weekdays in school, there are many hours outside the cafeteria where healthy choices need to be made. "There's no surprise, we need to engage in healthy behaviors," Dr. Walsh says. "Start with small changes and things that will bring a positive change into your life." There are four simple rules every family can follow: Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, drink more water and limit sugary drinks, limit screen time to one hour per day and get active for at least 60 minutes per day. Dr. Walsh also recommends creating habits like putting out a plate of raw vegetables each night before dinner so that pre-meal snacking is filled with high nutritional value.

family-runningSince childhood obesity has so many contributing factors, these solutions like Farm to Table programs and healthy examples of food and fitness at home must work in conjunction to reverse the problem. "I would love for [the cause of obesity] to be one thing because then we could go and fix that," she says. "It's sort of the perfect storm. We have a lot of food. We have a lot of access to food." From parties at school to snacks after soccer games, much of our lives have become centered on food. This availability of food has been accompanied by a reduction in PE classes and recess. The second main component to tackling childhood obesity is to get the kids moving again.

"If we were able to figure out 'energy in and energy out,' we would solve the obesity issue," says Vanetta Keyes, founder and executive director, Center Helping Obesity In Children End Successfully, Inc. (CHOICES). At CHOICES, parents are encouraged to set the standard. "We want parents to be an example," says Keyes. "You cannot ask your child to go walk because they are overweight, and you stay home and open a pint of ice cream. In order for children to change, they've got to see the adults in their lives as role models. They need to know that someone is there as their cheerleader."

Parent Myia Clay turned to CHOICES several years ago to help her teenage daughter, knowing that the 8th grader's activity level was causing a weight problem. "We wanted to find something that she could be a part of to encourage her to lose weight," says Clay, who appreciated the program enough that she still volunteers with CHOICES. "We increased her activities a bit. It was helpful allowing her to come to herself as an individual and say, 'This is what I need to do.'"

With many temptations readily available, the battle against childhood obesity will not be won overnight, but as awareness increases and schools and organizations join the fight, parents can find the support they need.

 

 

trailblazers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Trailblazers
Paving the way for healthy and active kids

 

Center Helping Obesity In Children End Successfully, Inc. (CHOICES)

Each year CHOICES, based in Kennesaw and downtown Atlanta, hosts two expos to bring health education into underserved communities. Those are the areas that need more after-school programs and subsidized activity offerings. At its new location, CHOICES will have a teaching kitchen where they will be able to train representatives who can take healthy practices into more communities. They also offer Camp Diva, a summer camp for overweight girls, and Sisters in the LITE, a 12-week program that teaches girls and women how to sustain a healthy weight by making lifestyle changes. www.choicesforkids.org

 

Camp Strong4Life

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's Strong4Life program combines a fun camp, parent involvement and healthy education for kids struggling with their weight. Families must attend Family Welcome Weekends in the spring and in the fall, while children attend a one-week summer camp where campers participate in traditional camp activities like rock climbing and swimming while also gaining the support of other children struggling with the same issues. www.strong4life.com

 

Kaiser Permanente Fit Kids Programs

Kaiser Permanente offers a variety of programs to help get kids to eat healthy, control their weight and stay active.

Snack Facts for KP Kids – This is a one-session hands-on class where kids and families learn together how to prepare delicious meals and nutritious snacks that even picky eaters will enjoy.

Operation Zero Weight Management – This is a program for children ages 9 to 17 that gives them six sessions with a dietitian, chef and fitness specialist and learn about healthy eating, exercise, the relationship between being overweight and diabetes, and reading food labels.

KP Fit Kids & Fire Up Your Feet – To encourage exercise, Kaiser Permanente hosts KP Fit Kids, six-week classes featuring fun, games and lots of high-energy movement. The new Fire Up Your Feet programs encourage families, students and schools to work together to get active by tracking activity during a Challenge Period and earning awards for schools. Even better, most of the offerings are free, but registration is required. www.kp.org

 

Active Schools Acceleration Project (ASAP)

ASAP is an entrepreneurial non-profit focused on increasing quality physical activity in schools. The organization will provide $1,000 to 1,000 schools ($1 million total) across the country to help implement one of three innovative movement programs. Any school in the nation can apply for the funding, and seven Atlanta-area schools were awarded monies for the 2013-2014 school year. www.activeschoolsasap.org

 

Georgia SHAPE

Launched by Governor Nathan Deal, this initiative addresses childhood obesity by providing digital resources at GeorgiaSHAPE.org. The resources include a fitness directory where people can enter their zip code and a list of nearby fitness programs will be provided. Georgia SHAPE also wants to combat childhood obesity at the very earliest by promoting breastfeeding. www.georgiashape.org

 

The Recess Rocks

This national initiative offers a low-cost way for schools and other organizations to integrate physical exercise into kids' days with things like "Subject Switchins" and "Hallway Grooves" to get kids moving in a fun way. Recess Rocks provides a free toolkit to implement their positive program in any area. www.recessrocks.com

 

PowerUp!

This after-school program combats childhood obesity in Georgia on the local level by encouraging physical activity and healthier eating habits for Georgia's kids. This initiative is led by the Resurgens Charitable Foundation, whose mission, among others, is to address childhood obesity. Some of PowerUP!'s other partners are the YMCA of Metropolitan Atlanta, fitAtlanta Magazine, and the Georgia Department of Education. www.powerupgeorgia.org

 

Voices for Healthy Kids

The national advocacy initiative Voices for Healthy Kids aims to address childhood obesity in the hardest hit communities by improving the nutritional quality of snack foods and beverages in schools, protecting children from marketing of unhealthy products, and increasing access to affordable healthy foods, safe parks and playgrounds. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Heart Association are behind this effort, hoping to reverse the childhood obesity trend by 2015. www.voicesforhealthykids.org

 

 

Editorial Resources
Active Schools Acceleration Project – www.activeschoolsasap.org
Camp Strong4Life - www.strong4life.com
Dr. Stephanie Walsh – Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, www.choa.org
Vanetta Keyes – CHOICES, Inc., www.choicesforkids.org
Emily Rose – Georgia Organics, www.georgiaorganics.org
Georgia SHAPE – www.georgiashape.org
Kaiser Permanente – www.kp.org
PowerUp! - www.powerupgeorgia.org
The Recess Rocks – www.recessrocks.com
Voices for Healthy Kids – www.voicesforhealthykids.org


Wednesday, 28 August 2013 20:21

Staying Informed About Prostate Cancer

There are perks to getting older – finally settling into a career, dishing out wisdom to younger generations and having more time to practice that golf swing. But there are cons too, some of which are the rising health concerns as we age. Men in particular have a unique health concern: prostate cancer. Their risk increases drastically as they approach 50, and more than 70 percent of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65. Prostate cancer, the most common non-skin cancer among men, affects the prostate gland and shows virtually no symptoms. "When the cancer is curable, there are zero symptoms," says Dr. Frank Critz, founder and medical director of Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia. "When prostate cancer shows symptoms, it may have moved to your bones and you develop back aches – this is when it's too late."

About one man in six will be diagnosed
with prostate cancer during his lifetime.

- The American Cancer Society

In 2012, more than 241,000 American men were diagnosed with the disease – in the U.S., one in six men will be affected by prostate cancer in their lifetime. "There are 30,000 men that die annually because of prostate cancer – it's a really broad spectrum of disease," Dr. Critz says. "We know that with the slow growing disease, you can have it for 20 or 30 years with no issue. The hard part is determining which treatment to choose when you are diagnosed." Before the anxiety sets in, it's important to know what you're dealing with, and since September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, now is as good a time as any to get educated.

As with many forms of cancer, certain groups will be affected more than others. According to Dr. James Benton, a board-certified radiation oncologist and president of Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia, "Men with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer, and men of African-American heritage, have a 2-2.5-fold increased risk of developing prostate cancer."

The American Cancer Society recently reported that the five-year survival rate for men with prostate cancer is nearly 100 percent, while the 15-year survival rate is 91 percent. However, the survival rate for men with prostate cancer depends on the location or spread of the cancer. Recent data from the National Cancer Institute shows that the survival rate for men with localized cancer, contained just to the prostate, is nearly 100 percent. This rate drops to just 29 percent once the cancer has spread to distant lymph nodes, bones, and other organs.

Early detection testing, such as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test or digital rectal exam (DRE), are the most common forms of prostate cancer screening. A PSA blood test measures the level of PSA, a substance made by the prostate gland, found in the blood – most healthy levels are under four nanograms per milliliter. A rising PSA level may indicate the presence of cancer.

Currently, the American Cancer Society recommends men discuss their testing options with their health care provider and make an informed decision. This discussion should take place at age 50 for men at an average risk for prostate cancer, at age 45 for men with a high risk (family history, African-American race), and at age 40 for men with more than one close family member who has had prostate cancer at an early age. The practice of earlier PSA testing is somewhat controversial – some urologists agree with the recommendation to test as necessary, while others feel this should only be an annual screening after a man reaches a certain age.

"The argument is that of all the people who have an annual PSA, a percentage may not have prostate cancer, and they still go through the cost of the testing and a biopsy if PSA levels are high," says Dr. Scott Miller of Georgia Urology. "The second argument is if someone is diagnosed, a lot of prostate cancer doesn't need to be treated immediately, but can be monitored. You don't want to over treat." Dr. Miller says, "However, the death rate is down 40 percent or greater since the introduction of PSA testing. The other side of the argument is that prostate cancer does not really cause symptoms while it is still curable. A PSA test is the only thing we have to detect at a time when [prostate cancer] is still curable. If we eliminate PSA, we don't know what the number of deaths would be."

Know Your Options

Over the last few years, there have been multiple advancements in screening and treatment. Before you decide which option is best for you, Dr. Benton says to ask your primary care physician three simple questions: What should be my PSA value for my age? What is the real risk of screening? What is the benefit and risk of treating prostate cancer? "Of note, there is little or no risk to screening, whether through a PSA or DRE test," he says.

New screening tests are on their way, such as a prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) test, which looks at the level of PCA3 in the urine. There is also a genetic test being developed to look at the DNA of cancer cells to assess the degree of aggressiveness. The treatment options for prostate cancer have improved from rudimentary surgery to advanced and minimally invasive procedures.

According to Dr. Benton, current treatment strategies include open or robotic surgery, various radiation approaches, cryotherapy, hormonal therapy, high intensity focus ultrasound, and immunotherapy. "I suspect in the future, other immunotherapies, biological agents, and possibly genetic management will be available," he says. "At this time, there are a number of therapeutic and diagnostic options on the horizon. Specifically, researchers are studying multi-gene panels to determine which prostate cancers are more likely to be virulent or indolent, and therefore, which cancer will benefit from immediate treatment, delayed treatment, or no treatment."

Just this year, Dr. Critz and Dr. Benton, along with Dr. Philip Shrake and Dr. Mark Merlin at RCOG, published the first prostate cancer study of its kind, analyzing 25 years of follow-up data after radiation therapy treatment in prostate cancer patients. The study analyzed men who received I-125 radioactive seed implants followed by beam radiation, and it concluded 73 percent of men who received this treatment had no evidence of prostate cancer 25 years after completion. "It's important to determine how long we should study men after they are cancer free. It used to be 10 years was good enough, and we find now that it's at least 15 years that we need to follow up. Five percent of the patients had cancer come back after 10 years," explains Dr. Critz.

Another important thing to note is patients may also be able to live with prostate cancer, under surveillance and annual check-ups, for years with little to no issue. "The biggest movement right now is the implementation of active surveillance. You don't necessarily have to be treated for prostate cancer if you are diagnosed," Dr. Critz says. "We need to educate the medical profession that there are people out there who can be observed."

When choosing a treatment option or educating yourself on the risks and signs, it's important to know the facts. With all of the information out there, Dr. Miller offers this simple advice: "Any male over the age of 40 needs to know their risk of prostate cancer and needs to know their risk of screening. One size does not fit all." Remember to seek advice from your doctor and most importantly, choose the option that works best for you.

Editorial Resources
Dr. Scott D. Miller – Georgia Urology, www.LapaRoboticSurgery.com
Dr. James Benton – Dr. Frank Critz, Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia, www.rcog.com


clark-howard

 

Clark Howard
Consumer expert/radio personality

When Clark Howard found out he was diagnosed with prostate cancer he was in Shanghai, China. "My wife got a call from the doctor that I had prostate cancer, and she had the unhappy task of telling me over the phone," he recalls. "I was disappointed, but that was about all as I knew I had very early stage. My Gleason score, a measurement of the severity of my cancer, was a 6, which is the lowest score you can have with a cancer diagnosis." Howard admits he didn't know of any family history of the disease, but nevertheless he was quick to start learning all he could about it. "While I was still in China, I found enormous information in medical journals. I read and read and read."

What was the first thing you did after you were diagnosed?

Continued sightseeing in coastal China. When I returned about a week later, I went with my wife to meet the urologist, Dr. Bruce Green and the surgeon, Dr. Nikki Shah.

What type of treatment did you undergo?

After my consultation with them and a follow-up with a cousin of mine, Dr. Skip Holden, who is a urologist in Los Angeles, I entered a program called active surveillance. I have a blood test every 90 days and at first, a biopsy every 12 months. My cancer has shown no growth in these five years, so now I have a biopsy every 18 months.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about prostate cancer?

That treatment must begin immediately. Prostate cancer is unique among all cancers. It comes in more than two dozen genetic varieties of various levels of aggressiveness. Somewhere between 25 percent and 50 percent of men with prostate cancer have a variety that is so low growth that it is likely to have a zero percent chance of danger to your life or life span. The other 50 percent to 75 percent of men (the exact percent is still being debated in science) must move quickly into treatment. The key is knowing which genetic group you are in. New testing can determine with a high degree of certainty which group you are in.

How has your diet changed since you were diagnosed?

I eat a lot more vegetables.  I even eat broccoli, and I hate broccoli but have it at least twice a week.

How has your outlook on life and health in general changed?

I have always had a sunny disposition.  That has stayed the same.  I eat much better and watch my weight like a hawk.  I weigh myself every day of my life.

What involvement do you have in raising awareness for prostate health?

I participate in prostate cancer run/walks, speak to organizations devoted to men's health and have joined the board of the Prostate Cancer Foundation.  I have used the microphone to spread the word on my syndicated radio show. I give an update once a year on the air and on clarkhoward.com.

What is your advice to men about this disease?

Don't panic.  If you find out you have prostate cancer, explore all your options.  If you are considered low risk, think about doing active surveillance.

Name something on your Bucket List

I want to go to Iceland and New Zealand.  I have been to every continent except Antarctica.  I always thought I wanted to go there, but they don't have chain restaurants.

Last book you read?

"Hot, Flat and Crowded" by Thomas Friedman

Who is your hero?

I have two:  Margaret Thatcher and Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

jerry-carnes

 

Jerry Carnes
Reporter with WXIA-TV, 11Alive

When Jerry Carnes was diagnosed with prostate cancer in August 2008, he was not surprised. "My father was diagnosed the year before with what would turn out to be incurable prostate cancer," he explains. "I kind of suspected it would pay me a visit at some point. The only real surprise was that it would come so early." Besides his father, cancer has also affected his sister's life. "My sister is currently beginning her fourth battle with breast cancer, but she is so upbeat it is unbelievable. If anyone can beat it, she can," he says. For his cancer, Carnes underwent robotic surgery and walked away with minimal side effects and a clean bill of health. "I had surgery and the cancer is gone. I'm really one of the really lucky ones."

What was the first thing you did after you were diagnosed?

I took a trip to North Carolina to visit a friend. I had a long drive to reflect and decided it was only proper for me to go public. I started a blog soon after and have kept it going for almost five years now.

Where did you go to find support?

I talked to a lot of people who've endured the same cancer and treatment. There are plenty of support groups out there, including the one at St. Joseph's Hospital where I had surgery. Most of all, I've relied on my family, mainly my wife, and on God.

What was the best piece of advice you received?

Do your research, talk to people who've been through it, and do what makes you feel comfortable. Treatment may not be necessary. There are low aggressive forms of cancer that you can survive for years. My cancer was not aggressive, and I could have picked a "wait and watch" approach. My fear was waiting 20 years before facing a cancer that decided to spread. I'd rather have surgery at 49 than 69. Don't limit your discussions to one doctor or one potential treatment. And include your wife. She'll ask the most pertinent and vital questions. Take her to every single doctor's appointment.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about prostate cancer?

That it's an old man's disease and it's no big deal. There are people in their 30s who've been diagnosed with it.

How has your outlook on life changed?

I've grown closer to God. It's not that I feel I had a brush with death. That's not it at all. It was a signal that I've reached an inevitable stage in my life. The stage where I need to acknowledge that I'm not so strong and that God is the only real source of true strength.

What involvement do you have in raising awareness for prostate health?

I talk, and I write. I've appeared at dozens of events to spread awareness. There's the Blue Ties luncheon every year and the Dash4Dads event at Father's Day that I promote. I'm a board member of the Men's Health and Wellness Center and the Georgia Prostate Cancer Coalition. The station, 11Alive, has also supported my efforts. They started a campaign called Wear the Gown as a way to spread the word about the dangers of prostate cancer.

What is your advice to men about this disease?

Don't be afraid to talk about it. Ask questions. It's nothing to be embarrassed about. There are a lot of us out there who've been through it, and we'll be honest with you. Just don't ignore it, that's deadly. I know so many men who don't even get yearly physicals and it breaks my heart. Knowledge is key.

Name something on your bucket list.

Do something significant in the fight against cancer.

Who is your hero?

My father.

 

ken-stevens

 

Ken Stevens
Georgia Prostate Cancer Coalition board member

Ken Stevens was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1987, before PSA was used as a detection tool. He went in for an exam and came out with the diagnosis of a lump on his prostate. "They sent me to a urologist who sent me to DeKalb Medical Center for a biopsy. They were done then by finding the target with a Digital Rectal Examination — no ultrasonic-guided technology was yet available," he explains. "The total time I spent at the hospital was three days — now it takes about one hour." After that exam, the results were still inconclusive, so Stevens returned later for more analysis. Eventually his diagnosis was unequivocal carcinoma of the prostate, and the orders were to schedule surgery.

He had a radical prostatectomy in February of 1989. It was discovered after his post-op procedures that Stevens was already at stage 3 in his cancer. Stevens says his first thought about the diagnosis was, "OK, let's get this thing out, and I'll go on about my business." His wife, a nurse at the Shepherd Center at the time, told him that his lack of reaction was because he didn't have a clue about what he was going through. Looking back, Stevens agrees, "Boy, was she right!"

What was the first thing you did after you were diagnosed?

I went to St. Simons and spent a week playing golf.

Where did you go to find support?

American Cancer Society. I had heard lots about BRCa and precious little about prostate cancer even though they had the same statistics. I swore I would strive to change that and volunteered to be a spokesman for the ACS. I've been doing that ever since. That was my support therapy.

What was the best piece of advice you received?

Keep on keepin' on. Spread the word. Talk about it.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about prostate cancer?

Number one on a "Myths about PCa" list is "You will not be able to have sex after treatment."  The myth can become reality if the PCa is found in an advanced stage.

How has your outlook on life changed?

I give thanks every day that I am vertical.  I used to take it for granted.

What involvement do you have in raising awareness for prostate health?

I've been a spokesman since 1990 for American Cancer Society. In 2000, a like-minded group of survivors (seven of us) founded the Georgia Prostate Cancer Coalition.  Our mission is to promote prostate cancer awareness.  We now number 17 on the board and some 35 to 40 like-minded survivors, all volunteers.

What is your advice to men about this disease?

Talk about it, learn about it and get information about it so that if you find it, you can make an educated decision. Remember that the first answer of this response is that the procedures are changing, and then, so must your knowledge.

Name something on your bucket list.

Get up in the morning. "There is no such thing as a bad day," says Hamilton Jordon, author of a book by the same name.

Last book you read?

"Surviving and Thriving — Candid, Real Life Stories of Prostate Cancer, A Complete Guide For Every Man (And Woman)," written and published by the staff at Midtown Urology.  My story is in chapter 13.

Who is your hero?

Roosevelt Grier, one of the fearsome foursome, a PC survivor, speaker about prostate cancer, and the best needlepoint artist of all time.

 

bill-buckley

 

Bill Buckley
Member of the Georgia Prostate Coalition/Former 13WMAZ anchor

Bill Buckley was diagnosed with prostate cancer in January of 2012. Buckley had no family history of this cancer, but when his regular doctor saw his PSA rise during physicals over an 18-month period of time, he referred him to a urologist for a biopsy. "PSA testing saved my life," he says. In March of 2012, Buckley opted to have his prostate removed. "'When in doubt, take it out' is the motto I heard a lot, and it was just the best option for me. There were side effects that occurred instantly as a result of the surgery such as incontinence and impotence. And while they lasted longer than I would have liked, I am now fully recovered and thankful that I chose the route I did. I am very fortunate."

What was the first thing you did after you were diagnosed?

I had to decide how I was going to go forward.  I could either fall down on the floor in self-pity, or I could simply realize how lucky I was to have found out early and return the favor by making certain other guys knew to get tested and watch their PSA levels.  Having a "mission" that I felt was worthy helped me focus on others and not on myself.  I remembered a phrase that I grew up with:  "God doesn't give you things you can't handle." I have since added to that, "But, he also expects you to handle what he gives you."

What was the best piece of advice you received?

To be patient. Recovering from surgery is a process. I'm sure the same is true with radiation or any other treatment.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about prostate cancer?

That it "won't happen to me." Too many guys are walking around now, completely unaware that they have the early stages of prostate cancer. One in six will get it. We need more guys to go to the doctor on a regular basis, get tested, and then to know their (PSA) score the way they know their golf score.

How has your outlook on life changed?

I know how much I am blessed to have excellent health care. I have a greater sense of how important it is to take care of myself.  I am still around at age 62 for a reason. I'd like to continue to be a survivor for a long, long time.

What involvement do you have in raising awareness for prostate health?

I have joined the Georgia Prostate Cancer Coalition (GPCC), a terrific organization that focuses on awareness. It's made up almost entirely of prostate cancer survivors who have a passion for awareness.

What is your advice to men about this disease?

Get regular checkups that include a physical exam of your prostate and a blood test that measures your PSA.  If you are going to have prostate cancer, find it early, while you still have choices (as I did). It's lousy not to have choices other than a dramatic, negative effect on your lifestyle and a shorter life.

Name something on your bucket list.

My wife and I never had a honeymoon when we were married. I couldn't afford it. I want to take her on a trip to Italy.

Last book you read?

"The Dragonfly Effect" by Andy Smith and Jennifer Aaker.

Who is your hero?

My father, who taught me early on in life to get a printed copy of the lab results from visits to the doctor so that I could know the actual results and keep up with them. That advice helped me see the value of PSA testing and played a major role in the awareness and early detection that saved my life.

 

 

Men’s Health
http://www.bestselfatlanta.com/Best-Self-Articles/Health-Wellness/Road-Map-to-Men’s-Health.html