Institute for Advanced Medical Research
Sheila Namanworth, D.M.D Sheila Namanworth, D.M.D

Aging, Depression and Anxiety

We all know that chronic stress can leave the body feeling exhausted and worn out. But what if the truth went one step further? Chronic stress, depression and anxiety can all cause major havoc with our physical wellness and actually speed up the aging process.

Research shows that depression and phobic anxiety accelerate the aging process at the molecular and chromosomal level. Telomeres, the caps at the ends of chromosomes, get smaller every time a cell divides and are markers of aging – those with depression have significantly shorter telomeres than unaffected individuals. Also, depression can cause inflammation and dysregulation in the body's stress and immune responses, leading to more frequent illness and premature aging. The good news is the damage may be reversible once the depression is treated.

Depression can also affect your heart health. New studies from Intermountain Healthcare found that for those with moderate to severe depression, taking antidepressants reduces the risk of heart disease more than taking a cholesterol-lowering drug. By treating depression, individuals can reduce their risk of a heart attack and improve their overall health.

Chronic stress and the resultant inflammation in the brain can contribute to Alzheimer's disease. Some scientists believe that greater stress may be the reason some women's brains age more prematurely than men's. Additionally, the production of the stress hormone adrenaline can lead to temporary vision and hearing loss.

shutterstock 154397297Aside from these changes, when people are depressed or anxious, they don't take care of themselves the way they should; individuals struggling with their emotional health tend to eat poorly, exercise less and self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. These behaviors only accelerate the aging process.

Individuals who believe that their chronic stress may actually be depression or anxiety should seek a diagnostic evaluation from a qualified psychiatrist who can determine if a physical, chemical brain imbalance is affecting their overall health and provide the appropriate treatment. By taking care of your brain health, you can be your best physical self!

About Dr. Sheila Namanworth

Sheila Namanworth, D.M.D, leads business development and community outreach efforts at the Institute for Advanced Medical Research. She is passionate about using innovation, creativity and teamwork to help individuals and organizations reach their highest potential. Committed to mental and physical wellness, Dr. Namanworth enjoys supporting others improve their lives and health in meaningful ways.

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